Evil Eye Knuckle Ring

 

Wear this lucky, protective evil eye ring on any knuckle or any finger.
Evil eye Knuckle Ring

 

So the new craze, the latest look is wearing a ring on the top part of your finger aka the knuckle.  No longer do you have to just layer bracelets and necklaces, but now you can layer the rings on your fingers as well!

 

Be stylish, be protected, be cool and add a knuckle ring with a sparkling evil eye to your hand!

 

See more ring designs on the website here: https://www.alefbet.com/knuckle-ring.html

AN EYEFUL EVIL EYE JEWELRY

Sterling silver evil eye bracelet
Sterling silver evil eye bracelets
Glass and evil eye silver bracelet
Evil Eye Glass and Silver Bracelet

Our “evil eye” jewelry is extremely popular. Some of the feedback we enjoy receiving is that our designs offer ancient talisman in modern, feminine, cool, hip, even glamorous and fabulous form. Basically, so you don’t feel like you’re wearing a museum relic—not that there’s anything wrong with antiquities, by the way. 

People from Israel, Greece, Sicily, Italy, Turkey, North Africa and other areas around the Mediterranean are usually familiar with this idea of the “eye”—it’s part of the culture and has been for thousands of years. The eye (usually blue) gazes out over doorways, dangles from the rear-view mirrors of taxicabs, and is carefully pinned inside baby-clothes. It even hangs around the necks of hard-working donkeys!

But maybe the concept loses a bit in translation. The use of the word “evil” puts some people off.

Blue Diamond and Gold Evil Eye

“Evil” sounds really aggressive, but folkloric scholars (and yes, there are such people) generally share the opinion that the evil eye is generally perceived as passive. Foremost among these scholars was Dr. Alan Dundes, who worked and taught at the University of Berkeley.

Dr. Dundes’ exhaustive and fascinating studies include an essay called “The Wet and the Dry: The Evil Eye.” Here, he discusses the idea that the evil eye is usually associated with envy, jealousy, or longing. The classic example: a childless woman, for instance, may gaze with yearning at a baby, and this results in the child being affected by the evil eye. The woman isn’t really “evil” in the contemporary sense of the word.

As for the title of Dr. Dundes’ essay, he associates traditional affliction by the evil eye with becoming parched, dried-out, and drought, true to the Middle Eastern origins of the symbol, where fresh water may be more precious than rubies and pearls.“Google” him for a really fascinating read.

Silver Evil Eye

And meanwhile, have yourself a nice, cool glass of water—hydration is key!—and check out our great collection of eye jewelry. Think of it as a “protective” eye watching over us all.

Feeling Lucky? Feeling Fortunate?

Maybe it’s just the smell of Spring in the air, or the time spent with family during the Spring holidays, but we’ve been thinking about the idea of “fortune” this week.

Good fortune necklace
Fortune jewelry

We use the word “fortune” the way we use the word “luck”—we have both good and bad “fortune” and “luck”.

From fortune-tellers and fortune-cookies, human beings have always been obsessed with this idea of “fortune”.  In this sense, “fortune” is used in the context divining the future. In our more suggestible moments, we look to a Magic 8-Ball, or read the patterns of swirled coffee-grounds and tea-leaves, cards, creases in the palms of the hand, cowrie shells, and a
thousand other “methods” for telling us what will happen next. And hoping for
the best.

We may also use the word to mean a large sum of money– “I spent a fortune on that dress”. Using the word “fortune” to mean material wealth suggests that we got rich by being lucky.

We may in fact plan, strategize, invest, scrimp, save and work very hard to collect our cash and goods. But they can vanish in the wink of an eye, i.e., a bad divorce-settlement, or worse. The latter half of this is definitely “bad fortune”.

As modern people, we want to feel that we control our destiny. Do we? Our persistent interest in fortune and luck suggests that there is a cosmic wild-card which may be played at any time. Our fortunes may reverse in a heartbeat, in spite of all our planning, fretting, bitten fingernails and sleepless nights.

In fact, the popular game-show, “Wheel of Fortune”, finds its roots in ancient Rome: Fortuna was an especially fickle goddess, who became associated with a revolving wheel, because no one’s fortune, or luck, is always constant.

Like the classic Sinatra song goes, ” you’re ridin’ high in April, shot down in May. That’s life!”

It’s human nature to want to protect our wealth, our health, our well-being, and to protect our loved ones in the same way. Some of our most popular designs literally feature the word “protection”. Others protect the wearer symbolically, with the Shield of David (Mogen David), the hamsa, the eye. If you’re feeling really lucky, wear them all!