Written Language and Jewelry

Do you Dress Like the Queen of the Nile?

 

The desire to ornament ourselves is deep, deep in our human DNA.  Archeological digs from every part of the world reveal that people have always loved to wear jewelry, even before they had written language. Aztec and Mayan glyphs depict royalty wearing earrings and belts made from the plumes of parrots and the iridescent wings of butterflies. Viking graves reveal aristocrats accessorized for the afterlife wearing strands of amber beads and intricately carved bronze torques, a solid, collar-like necklace with an opening at the front. And most famously, the Egyptians dressed for life—and death—in shimmering headdresses, bib necklaces, rings and cuffs of yellow gold set with lapis lazuli, carnelian and onyx.

Today’s trend is minimalist, compared with the wow-factor of these ancestral tastes. One of the reasons: written language.

Maybe you’re not up for dressing like the Queen of the Nile most days. A great pair of jeans and the perfect white tee-shirt may be more your style—but what takes this modern uniform from “whatever” to a fashion look is the right piece of gold jewelry. The simpler the better: a subtle but substantial piece of gold that rests close to your heart. Based on more than 15 years of designing jewelry, we find that the piece of gold jewelry most women want today is an sleek, refined necklace which incorporates the names of kids and grandchildren. Perhaps it’s just the first initial of your child. Just one character may say it all. Say it in English or Hebrew—we create name-necklaces in both languages using both alphabets. In fact, that’s how our design business got started, creating cube- “letter” beads in Hebrew when the tradition had just started (Alef Bet, for any of you who don’t know, means “A,B” in Hebrew!).

Hebrew Name necklace
Engraving a Hebrew name necklace

We create many variations on name-necklaces which are so easy to wear, each piece will become the favorite you want to wear everyday!

The power of the names of those we love has never been more precious as the world becomes more and more global. Your kids and grandchildren may live in your hometown, or may live, work and play on another continent. Keep them close with Skype, and with a name-necklace from Alef Bet.

Our favorite customer testimonial goes like this: a chic grandmother we know wears a 14-karat and diamond Alef Bet necklace of seemingly random letters: “D,D,M,R”. But the letters aren’t random at all: the characters stand for her sons David and Daniel, and her granddaughters Miriam and Ruth. But that explanation may not be necessary. When someone asks grandma what the letters mean, she says simply “My family.”

 

 

Natalie Portman’s Baby Alef

I thought I wouldn’t chime in here about the name Alef, but according to People magazine, the name gets an A+.

Natalie Portman

Really?

I know it is special, it is unique, it represents beginnings and the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet.  You can read about the Hebrew letters here if you want to be educated.  Ok, all I am saying is that the name is the basis for teasing.  I mean come on, we have the company name Alef Bet and people crack up and think they are so unique by asking, “hey where’s the gimel?”  I just feel for this little guy, he will be tormented by questions, “where’s bet?”  Or better yet, when they learn the Hebrew alphabet in preschool and they start with “alef- bet- vet, gimel- dalet -hey….” Oh my, I get goose bumps.

But hey, I might be wrong.  The Jewish Journal thinks the name is better than some of the other celebrities.

I did name my oldest daughter Myahn.  Maybe I, too,  am a rebel?

What do you think?