Sterling silver evil eye bracelet
Sterling silver evil eye bracelets
Glass and evil eye silver bracelet
Evil Eye Glass and Silver Bracelet

Our “evil eye” jewelry is extremely popular. Some of the feedback we enjoy receiving is that our designs offer ancient talisman in modern, feminine, cool, hip, even glamorous and fabulous form. Basically, so you don’t feel like you’re wearing a museum relic—not that there’s anything wrong with antiquities, by the way. 

People from Israel, Greece, Sicily, Italy, Turkey, North Africa and other areas around the Mediterranean are usually familiar with this idea of the “eye”—it’s part of the culture and has been for thousands of years. The eye (usually blue) gazes out over doorways, dangles from the rear-view mirrors of taxicabs, and is carefully pinned inside baby-clothes. It even hangs around the necks of hard-working donkeys!

But maybe the concept loses a bit in translation. The use of the word “evil” puts some people off.

Blue Diamond and Gold Evil Eye

“Evil” sounds really aggressive, but folkloric scholars (and yes, there are such people) generally share the opinion that the evil eye is generally perceived as passive. Foremost among these scholars was Dr. Alan Dundes, who worked and taught at the University of Berkeley.

Dr. Dundes’ exhaustive and fascinating studies include an essay called “The Wet and the Dry: The Evil Eye.” Here, he discusses the idea that the evil eye is usually associated with envy, jealousy, or longing. The classic example: a childless woman, for instance, may gaze with yearning at a baby, and this results in the child being affected by the evil eye. The woman isn’t really “evil” in the contemporary sense of the word.

As for the title of Dr. Dundes’ essay, he associates traditional affliction by the evil eye with becoming parched, dried-out, and drought, true to the Middle Eastern origins of the symbol, where fresh water may be more precious than rubies and pearls.“Google” him for a really fascinating read.

Silver Evil Eye

And meanwhile, have yourself a nice, cool glass of water—hydration is key!—and check out our great collection of eye jewelry. Think of it as a “protective” eye watching over us all.

Mimuna Festival

preparing Mimuna dough
Preparing Mufleta dough


Have you ever wondered how to end the
Passover holiday? Usually you just start eating bread and call it quits, right?

Not my family in Israel! I was introduced to the
Mimouna festival, which the Israelis of North African descent celebrate to mark
the end of Passover. I was lucky enough to “steal” these current photos from
Facebook of my family’s celebration.

First you make the mufleta, which is a
cross between a tortilla and Indian fry-bread, a difficult, fattening process.
It takes time to make, and don’t forget that you have make a market run to buy
the flour and yeast, since you have none in the house.

For about 20 mufletas:

  • 3 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
    For serving: Butter and honey

Total time: 2 hours

Combine the flour, sugar, salt, water and
yeast. Knead and let rise until doubled in size. Break off golfball-sized lumps
of dough, roll into balls and dip into oil. Let rise again until doubled in

On a flat surface, take one ball of dough,
flatten, and using your fingertips, stretch into a round, flat disc. You want
the dough to be thin, and round. Sort of like a tortilla. Dough might tear,
that is okay.

Heat a frying pan, and lay the flattened
dough into the pan. Let cook for a minute on one side, until it dries slightly,
and then flip. Meanwhile, flatten another dough ball.

Lay the second flattened dough ball on top
of the first mufleta in the pan and keep flipping and adding more mufleta.
There will be a pile of mufletas. Continue like this until either the dough is
gone or the stack becomes too tall.

To serve, spread the hot mufletas with
butter and

honey, and fold into quarters. They’ll get warm, drippy and gooey.

My sisters in law always decorate the table
with mint leaves and flowers. Food really isn’t necessary since you will be
over-loading on mufletas.

If you are really in the partying mood,
have the Mimuna party continue on through the next day with a bbq. You should
see what goes on in Israel!!
The thought just makes me hungry and home-sick, but all the work and calories
are worth it!!